Chronicity of the ulcer diathesis

N2 - Management of complications of peptic ulcer disease, including hemorrhage, perforation, and obstruction, remain the responsibility of the general surgeon. Although flexible esophagogastro-duodenoscopy is essential for accurate diagnosis and may offer valuable therapeutic options for hemorrhage and obstruction, surgical intervention is essential in many cases, often in the most critically ill patients. Although our new understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori and current efforts to eradicate this organism may result in a decrease in the incidence of these complications, this effect has not yet materialized nor will it necessarily be a factor in complicated ulcer disease. Better understanding of the mechanisms by which H. pylori damages the gastrointestinal mucosa is needed. In the interim, the long- standing success of operations developed to decrease gastric acid secretion suggest that both acid and H. pylori are important causative factors in gastroduodenal injury. Although elective operations for ulcer disease are likely to become of historic interest, surgical procedures for treatment of complications will remain essential elements for the treatment of these conditions in critically ill patients. The surgical opportunity to treat ulcer diathesis definitively should continue to be used in that important setting.

to control the high gastric acid output and sever the ulcer diathesis

AB - Peptic ulcer in childhood is increasing in incidence and demonstrating an unsuspected virulence. Surgery may thus play an increasing role in the therapy of this disease. An experimental study of the effects of the major operations for peptic ulcer on the growth and nutrition of puppies was carried out. Vagotomy and pyloroplasty did not alter the development of the animals as compared with the control group. Following vagotomy and antrectomy or subtotal gastrectomy there was an immediate loss of weight with a subsequent growth lag and deficit for the entire period of observation. Hematologic, roentgenologic, and fat-absorption studies were normal in all groups. On the basis of this study the authors feel that vagotomy and pyloroplasty will least disturb growth and nutrition in the young, and if this procedure is effective in controlling the ulcer diathesis, it should be the operation of choice in children.


Colon Function - Puristat Digestive Wellness

Marcy, Deane S., "Etiology of peptic ulcer : with emphasis on the ulcer diathesis" (1939)

Peptic ulcer in childhood is increasing in incidence and demonstrating an unsuspected virulence. Surgery may thus play an increasing role in the therapy of this disease. An experimental study of the effects of the major operations for peptic ulcer on the growth and nutrition of puppies was carried out. Vagotomy and pyloroplasty did not alter the development of the animals as compared with the control group. Following vagotomy and antrectomy or subtotal gastrectomy there was an immediate loss of weight with a subsequent growth lag and deficit for the entire period of observation. Hematologic, roentgenologic, and fat-absorption studies were normal in all groups. On the basis of this study the authors feel that vagotomy and pyloroplasty will least disturb growth and nutrition in the young, and if this procedure is effective in controlling the ulcer diathesis, it should be the operation of choice in children.


List of cutaneous conditions - Wikipedia

Management of complications of peptic ulcer disease, including hemorrhage, perforation, and obstruction, remain the responsibility of the general surgeon. Although flexible esophagogastro-duodenoscopy is essential for accurate diagnosis and may offer valuable therapeutic options for hemorrhage and obstruction, surgical intervention is essential in many cases, often in the most critically ill patients. Although our new understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori and current efforts to eradicate this organism may result in a decrease in the incidence of these complications, this effect has not yet materialized nor will it necessarily be a factor in complicated ulcer disease. Better understanding of the mechanisms by which H. pylori damages the gastrointestinal mucosa is needed. In the interim, the long- standing success of operations developed to decrease gastric acid secretion suggest that both acid and H. pylori are important causative factors in gastroduodenal injury. Although elective operations for ulcer disease are likely to become of historic interest, surgical procedures for treatment of complications will remain essential elements for the treatment of these conditions in critically ill patients. The surgical opportunity to treat ulcer diathesis definitively should continue to be used in that important setting.