Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis of the Lumbar …

As with most diseases of the spinal column, there is no cure for scoliosis. Bracing is considered necessary in some cases of preadolescent scoliosis to prevent progression of the disease. The standard treatments for pain due to scoliosis are over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription narcotic and non-narcotic medication, rest, physical therapy, steroid injections, and traction. As most patients who suffer with scoliosis pain soon realize, these treatments are usually not sufficient and many, especially the oral medications, are associated with serious side effects such as sedation, nausea, constipation, and even addiction. Extended use of some over-the-counter (OTC) medications such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetaminophen may even result in stomach ulcers, kidney failure, heart failure, and liver failure. Many sufferers with scoliosis pain often search for alternative solutions to the usual over-the-counter and prescription medications. Surgery may be required when the excruciating pain does not resolve or when severe nerve damage is evident. However, even with the best surgeon, surgery is not always successful and in many cases, the patient’s condition worsens.

Spondylolisthesis: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

Background: Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are common abnormalities of the lumbar spine. The incidence of these diagnoses is recognized in the healthy population. However, their incidence in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients is less well defined. Methods: This is a retrospective radiographic review of patients treated in the OI clinic from a single institution. Lateral radiographs were reviewed on all available patients to assess the incidence of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in this patient population. The morphology of the pedicle and pars interarticularis was also evaluated to identify any abnormalities or dysplasia of these structures. Results: One hundred ten of the 139 patients treated in the OI clinic met the inclusion criteria for this study. Of these patients, 79% (87 of 110) were ambulatory. The overall incidence of spondylolysis in this pediatric OI population was found to be 8.2% (9 of 110) at an average age of 7.5 years. The incidence of spondylolisthesis was 10.9% (12 of 110) at an average age of 6.5 years with 75% (3 of 12) being isthmic type and 25% (3 of 12) dysplastic. The combined incidence of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis was 19.2%. Incidentally, the pedicle length was noted to be elongated in 40.0% (44 of 110) of this OI population. Conclusions: This study found that the incidence of spondylolysis in a group of children with OI was much higher than in the normal pediatric population, which has been reported to be 2.6% to 4.0%. This incidence was also found to be higher than previously reported incidence of spondylolysis in OI patients (5.3%). The incidence of spondylolisthesis was also found to be much higher than that of the normal pediatric population (4.2%). It is important to recognize this higher incidence of these abnormalities and to anticipate future associated symptoms and potential worsening listhesis that can clinically affect the lifestyles of these children and potentially require surgical treatment. The clinical significance of these findings will necessitate long-term follow-up.


Spondylolisthesis Overview | Grades, Causes, and …

A review of the current literature shows that there is a lack of consensus regarding the treatment of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents.

N2 - Background: Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are common abnormalities of the lumbar spine. The incidence of these diagnoses is recognized in the healthy population. However, their incidence in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients is less well defined. Methods: This is a retrospective radiographic review of patients treated in the OI clinic from a single institution. Lateral radiographs were reviewed on all available patients to assess the incidence of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in this patient population. The morphology of the pedicle and pars interarticularis was also evaluated to identify any abnormalities or dysplasia of these structures. Results: One hundred ten of the 139 patients treated in the OI clinic met the inclusion criteria for this study. Of these patients, 79% (87 of 110) were ambulatory. The overall incidence of spondylolysis in this pediatric OI population was found to be 8.2% (9 of 110) at an average age of 7.5 years. The incidence of spondylolisthesis was 10.9% (12 of 110) at an average age of 6.5 years with 75% (3 of 12) being isthmic type and 25% (3 of 12) dysplastic. The combined incidence of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis was 19.2%. Incidentally, the pedicle length was noted to be elongated in 40.0% (44 of 110) of this OI population. Conclusions: This study found that the incidence of spondylolysis in a group of children with OI was much higher than in the normal pediatric population, which has been reported to be 2.6% to 4.0%. This incidence was also found to be higher than previously reported incidence of spondylolysis in OI patients (5.3%). The incidence of spondylolisthesis was also found to be much higher than that of the normal pediatric population (4.2%). It is important to recognize this higher incidence of these abnormalities and to anticipate future associated symptoms and potential worsening listhesis that can clinically affect the lifestyles of these children and potentially require surgical treatment. The clinical significance of these findings will necessitate long-term follow-up.