New evidence supports his thesis.

thesis - Memidex dictionary/thesaurus thesis noun an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument Type of: premise a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a ...

A handful of nouns appear to be plural in form but take a singular verb:

That’s an unusual way of putting it. Men isn’t a new word. It’s just the plural form of the same word. I guess you mean nouns that have nonstandard plural forms? A large number of them are listed in this article.


thesis - Wiktionary thesis f ‎(plural theses or thesissen, ...

An example of master is a dictator who has control over the people around him.

Many careful writers insist that the words and are Latin plurals and must, therefore, be used as plural words. The singular Latin forms of these words, however, are seldom used: as a single bit of information or as a single means of communication. Many authorities nowadays approve sentences like My data is lost. and The media is out to get the President. Even textbooks in computer science are beginning to use "data" as a singular.


thesis - definition of thesis in English from the Oxford ...

The names of sports teams, on the other hand, are treated as plurals, regardless of the form of that name. We would write that "The Yankees have signed a new third baseman" and "The Yankees are a great organization" (even if we're Red Sox fans) and that "For two years in a row, the Utah Jazz have attempted to draft a big man." When we refer to a team by the city in which it resides, however, we use the singular, as in "Dallas has attempted to secure the services of two assistant coaches that Green Bay hopes to keep." (This is decidedly not a British practice. In the UK, the city or country names by which British newspapers refer to soccer teams, for example, are used as plurals — a practice that seems odd and inconsistent to American ears: "A minute's silence will precede the game at Le Stadium today, when Toulouse play Munster, and tomorrow at Lansdowne Road, when Leinster attempt to reach their first European final by beating Perpignan" [report in the online ].)

Some nouns don’t change at all between singular and plural forms.

We use an apostrophe to create plural forms in two limited situations: for pluralized letters of the alphabet and when we are trying to create the plural form of a word that refers to the word itself. Here we also should italicize this "word as word," but not the 's ending that belongs to it. Do use the apostrophe+s to create the plural of acronyms (pronounceable abbreviations such as laser and IRA and URL*) and other abbreviations. (A possible exception to this last rule is an acronym that ends in "S": "We filed four NOS's in that folder.")

' or ' Should Athens spend money to build a defensive wall?

Note that "the number" is a singular collective noun. "The number of applicants steadily increasing." "A number," on the other hand, is a plural form: "There are several students in the lobby. A number here to see the president."

“It came straight from the horses mouth!”

Some abbreviations have embedded plural forms, and there are often inconsistencies in creating the plurals of these words. The speed of an internal combustion engine is measured in "revolutions per minute" or rpm (lower case) and the efficiency of an automobile is reported in "miles per gallon" or mpg (no "-s" endings). On the other hand, baseball players love to accumulate "runs batted in," a statistic that is usually reported as RBIs (although it would not be terribly unusual to hear that someone got 100 RBI last year — and some baseball commentators will talk about "ribbies," too). Also, the U.S. military provides "meals ready to eat" and those rations are usually described as MREs (not MRE). When an abbreviation can be used to refer to a singular thing — a run batted in, a meal ready-to-eat, a prisoner of war — it's surely a good idea to form the plural by adding "s" to the abbreviation: RBIs, MREs, POWs. (Notice that no apostrophe is involved in the formation of these plurals. Whether abbreviations like these are formed with upper- or lower-case letters is a matter of great mystery; only your dictionary editor knows for sure.)