Glossary | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

AB - Autoantibodies against deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) proteins are commonly detected in patients with lupus erythematosus (LE). Antibodies against native DNA are frequently detected in a subset of LE patients with a high prevalence of renal disease. Single-stranded DNA antibodies are also commonly detected in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but recent evidence indicates that approximately 25% of patients with benign, cutaneous (discoid) lupus also possess single-stranded DNA IgM autoantibodies. LE patients also frequently possess antibodies directed against a variety of ribonuclear proteins (RNP). These RNA protein autoantibodies are generally divided into two groups. One group is termed snRNPs (small nuclear ribonuclear protein); the other is termed scRNPs (small cytoplasmic ribonuclear protein). Anti-RNA protein autoantibodies occur as frequently in patients with SLE as do native DNA antibodies. Furthermore, in contradistinction to nDNA antibodies, lupus patients generally make large quantities (detected by gel precipitin techniques) of anti-RNP antibodies. The anti-RNP antibodies are directed against proteins that bind with specific RNA nucleotides. The best evidence at present indicates that these RNA proteins containing the specific RNA nucleotides are involved in RNA processing and posttranslational activities such as protein synthesis. Furthermore, these SLE autoantibodies are now being employed, together with other autoantibody systems detected in other connective tissue diseases, to define the biological role of the respective RNA proteins.

De novo synthesis the formation of an essential molecule from simple precursor molecules

IRS 954. The potential role of PDC as a therapeutic target has been tested indirectly in SLE through inhibition of TLR, intending to stop intracellular signaling leading to synthesis of IFN-α by these cells and avoiding its production. Oligo-deoxynucleotides (ODN) containing non-methylated CpG sequences act as antagonists of TLR9, which has led to the development of modified sequences substituting them for methylated ribonucleotides, obtaining antagonists for TLR9, TLR7 or both. One of those dual antagonists, IRS 954 has been tested in a mouse model (NZB×NZW)F1, showing an increase in survival and a reduction in specific autoantibody levels, as well as in proteinuria, severity of glomerulonephritis and organ damage.


Systemic lupus erythematosus - The Lancet

15/04/2011 · Underexpression of mitochondrial-DNA encoded ATP synthesis-related genes and DNA repair genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

Autoantibodies against deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) proteins are commonly detected in patients with lupus erythematosus (LE). Antibodies against native DNA are frequently detected in a subset of LE patients with a high prevalence of renal disease. Single-stranded DNA antibodies are also commonly detected in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but recent evidence indicates that approximately 25% of patients with benign, cutaneous (discoid) lupus also possess single-stranded DNA IgM autoantibodies. LE patients also frequently possess antibodies directed against a variety of ribonuclear proteins (RNP). These RNA protein autoantibodies are generally divided into two groups. One group is termed snRNPs (small nuclear ribonuclear protein); the other is termed scRNPs (small cytoplasmic ribonuclear protein). Anti-RNA protein autoantibodies occur as frequently in patients with SLE as do native DNA antibodies. Furthermore, in contradistinction to nDNA antibodies, lupus patients generally make large quantities (detected by gel precipitin techniques) of anti-RNP antibodies. The anti-RNP antibodies are directed against proteins that bind with specific RNA nucleotides. The best evidence at present indicates that these RNA proteins containing the specific RNA nucleotides are involved in RNA processing and posttranslational activities such as protein synthesis. Furthermore, these SLE autoantibodies are now being employed, together with other autoantibody systems detected in other connective tissue diseases, to define the biological role of the respective RNA proteins.