Ammar, "Synthesis and applications of silver nanoparticles",

This is different from the neutral polymeric compounds, in which particle size is affected easily by the amount of dispersing agents since the nanoparticles are dispersed by steric hindrance of PVP [].

T1 - Subsurface synthesis and characterization of Ag nanoparticles embedded in MgO

Silver is also found to be non-toxic to humans in minute concentrations. The microorganisms are unlikely to develop resistance against silver as compared to antibiotics as silver attacks a broad range of targets in the microbes 49. Experimental trials are needed to understand the toxicity. There are some questions, which need to be addressed, such as, the exact mechanism of interaction of silver nanoparticles with the bacterial cells, how the surface area of nanoparticles influence its killing activity, use of animal models and clinical studies to get a better understanding of the antimicrobial efficiency of silver dressings, the toxicity if any of the silver dressings, etc.


Silver nanoparticles: green synthesis and antimicrobial applications

Over the past few decades, many synthetic methods of silver nanoparticles have been studied.

of silver nanoparticle was tested against shown in and for rind extract by disc diffusion method shown in . The activity of silver nanoparticle and rind extract was observed by the zone of inhibition. The activity is may be due to the disruption of cell wall. Most antifungal agents target the formation or function of ergosterol, the major sterol present in the cell membrane ().


Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles byMulberry LeavesExtract

N2 - Metal nanoparticles exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) which is very sensitive to the size and shape of the nanoparticle and the surrounding dielectric medium. The coupling between the electromagnetic radiation and the localized surface plasmon in metallic nanoparticles results in a sizable enhancement of the incident fields, making them possible candidates for plasmonic applications. In particular, partially exposed metallic nanoparticles distributed in a dielectric matrix can provide prime locations for LSPR spectroscopy and sensing. We report the synthesis and characterization of a plasmonic substrate consisting of Ag nanoparticles partially buried in MgO. Ag nanoparticles of different shapes and size distributions were synthesized below the surface of MgO by implanting 200 keV Ag+ ions followed by annealing at 1000 °C for 10 and 30 h. A detailed optical and structural characterization was carried out to understand the evolution of the Ag nanoparticle and size distribution inside the MgO matrix. Micro x-ray diffraction (Micro-XRD) was employed to investigate the structural properties and estimate the crystallite size. The nanoparticles evolved from a spherical to a faceted morphology with annealing time, assuming an octahedral shape truncated at the (001) planes, as visualized from aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The nanoparticles embedded in MgO were shown to be pure metallic Ag using atom probe tomography (APT). The nanoparticles were partially exposed to the surface by employing plasma etch techniques to remove the overlaying MgO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to study the surface morphology and obtain a height distribution for the partially exposed nanoparticles.

Extraction of Silver Nanoparticles from resulting reduction ..

Metal nanoparticles exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) which is very sensitive to the size and shape of the nanoparticle and the surrounding dielectric medium. The coupling between the electromagnetic radiation and the localized surface plasmon in metallic nanoparticles results in a sizable enhancement of the incident fields, making them possible candidates for plasmonic applications. In particular, partially exposed metallic nanoparticles distributed in a dielectric matrix can provide prime locations for LSPR spectroscopy and sensing. We report the synthesis and characterization of a plasmonic substrate consisting of Ag nanoparticles partially buried in MgO. Ag nanoparticles of different shapes and size distributions were synthesized below the surface of MgO by implanting 200 keV Ag+ ions followed by annealing at 1000 °C for 10 and 30 h. A detailed optical and structural characterization was carried out to understand the evolution of the Ag nanoparticle and size distribution inside the MgO matrix. Micro x-ray diffraction (Micro-XRD) was employed to investigate the structural properties and estimate the crystallite size. The nanoparticles evolved from a spherical to a faceted morphology with annealing time, assuming an octahedral shape truncated at the (001) planes, as visualized from aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The nanoparticles embedded in MgO were shown to be pure metallic Ag using atom probe tomography (APT). The nanoparticles were partially exposed to the surface by employing plasma etch techniques to remove the overlaying MgO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to study the surface morphology and obtain a height distribution for the partially exposed nanoparticles.