IB Biology Notes - 9.1 Plant structure and growth

Bio.4.2.1 Analyze photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of how energy is stored, released, and transferred within and between these systems.

IB Biology notes on 9.1 Plant structure and growth

They will determine the rate of transpiration for one plant branch.A lesson plan for grades 9–12 ScienceBy , , , , , and


for photosynthesis and respiration)

Prove that increased leaf starch increases the process of photosynthesis in the green plantDo Photosynthesis and Growth Rate Affect Stomatal Density?

Effect of different colors of light on the rate of photosynthesisThe effect of different lights on plant growth: incandescent light, fluorescent light, sunlight and black light.


the sites in most plants where respiration, transpiration , ..

Stem Tubers: These are modified stems which serve as food storage. The stem extends into the ground and forms enlarged, swollen structures which we call stem tubers. Stem tubers are used to store nutrients and therefore allow the plant to survive winter as well as other adverse conditions. They also serve as a mean of asexual reproduction as new plants develop from these stem tubers. An example of a stem tuber is a potato.

Photosynthesis/physiology* Plant ..

Plants that lose their leaves in winter store food produced during the summer by photosynthesis. They store enough food to last them over winter, and to provide energy reserves for new growth in the spring.

respiration and photosynthesis) ..

Overview

Transpiration is the loss of water from a plant in the form of water vapor. Water is absorbed by roots from the soil and transported as a liquid to the leaves via xylem. In the leaves, small pores allow water to escape as a vapor and CO2 to enter the leaf for photosynthesis. Of all the water absorbed by plants, less than 5% remains in the plant for growth and storage following growth. This lesson will explain why plants lose so much water, the path water takes through plants, how plants might control for too much water loss to avoid stress conditions, and how the environment plays a role in water loss from plants.

Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

Plant Pigments and Photosynthesis

The effects of various pH levels on the photosynthesis process of the aquatic plant elodeaThe effects of phosphorous on the photosynthesis of aquatic plantsDoes light affect stem growth?

Pearson - The Biology Place - Prentice Hall Bridge page

The plant meristem is a type of tissue found at several locations on plants. This tissue is composed of cells which are totipotent. This means that these cells are able to divide and make all the types of cells of that particular plant at any given time. Meristem tissue allows continuous growth and the formation of new organs. Apical meristems are found at the tips of roots and shoots. The apical meristem is responsible for the elongation of roots and stems. It allows the stem to grow taller and the roots to increase in length. Also, the shoot apical meristem allows the formation of new leaves and flowers. The growth in height of the stem is important for photosynthesis while the lengthening of the roots is important for the plant to anchor deep into the soil and it is also vital for the uptake of water and nutrients found in deeper soil layers. The growth taking place at apical meristems is called primary growth. In addition, plants also grow by increasing the diameter of their stems and roots. This is called secondary growth and is a result of cell devision in the lateral meristems. It allows extra xylem and phloem tissue production and it also provides stability for the plant to grow taller.