Phd Thesis On Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria

N2 - In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II. P680 Primary electron donor of photosystem II Y Z Redox active tyrosine residue of photosystem II, secondary electron donor to P680 +

bacteria resides in oxygenated environments and requires oxygen for photosynthesis

has both RC I and RC II, and under conditions of low H2S, switches to RC II and performs oxygenic photosynthesis (Oscillatoria is a member of the Cyanobacteria.


Gram-Negative Oxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria | …

Although chlorophyll-based photosynthesis is widely distributed among the Bacteria, those that perform oxygenic photosynthesis form a phylogenetically monolithic group: all members of the cyanobacterial group share this physiology, and no organisms outside of the cyanobacteria have it.


These bacteria are at the end of anaerobic food chain that ..

AB - In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II. P680 Primary electron donor of photosystem II Y Z Redox active tyrosine residue of photosystem II, secondary electron donor to P680 +

Photosynthetic Bacteria: History and Classification | Microbiology

In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II. P680 Primary electron donor of photosystem II Y Z Redox active tyrosine residue of photosystem II, secondary electron donor to P680 +

Another type of oxygenic bacteria has recently been ..

Fischer suggests that while it might be tempting to think the genes for oxygenic photosynthesis came, via lateral transfer, from one of the six phyla of bacteria capable of non-oxygenic photosynthesis, in reality, “… it seems just as possible that whoever gave Cyanobacteria the genes for photosynthesis went extinct long ago.”