Welcome to the Journal of Articles in Support of the Null Hypothesis

Approached in this way, reading journal articles will reinforce your knowledge of, and develop your thinking about, the topic, by finding out what other people have to say and keeping up with latest developments in the research.

The two articles that I will be using are from WebMD and Journal of American College Health.

The double-deficit hypothesis of developmental dyslexia proposes that deficits in phonological processing and naming speed represent independent sources of dysfunction in dyslexia. The present article is a review of the evidence for the double-deficit hypothesis, including a discussion of recent findings related to the hypothesis. Studies in this area have been characterized by variability in methodology - how dyslexia is defined and identified, and how dyslexia subtypes are classified. Such variability sets limitations on the extent to which conclusions may be drawn with respect to the double-deficit hypothesis. Furthermore, the literature is complicated by the persistent finding that measures of phonological processing and naming speed are significantly correlated, resulting in a statistical artifact that makes it difficult to disentangle the influence of naming speed from that of phonological processing. Longitudinal and intervention studies of the double-deficit hypothesis are needed to accumulate evidence that investigates a naming speed deficit that is independent of a phonological deficit for readers with dyslexia. The existing evidence does not support a persistent core deficit in naming speed for readers with dyslexia.


Finding Scholarly Journal Articles for Research - …

AB - It is well established that increasing attitude certainty makes attitudes more resistant to attack and more predictive of behavior. This finding has been interpreted as indicating that attitude certainty crystallizes attitudes, making them more durable and impactful. The current research challenges this crystallization hypothesis and proposes an amplification hypothesis, which suggests that instead of invariably strengthening an attitude, attitude certainty amplifies the dominant effect of the attitude on thought, judgment, and behavior. In 3 experiments, the authors test these competing hypotheses by comparing the effects of attitude certainty manipulations on univalent versus ambivalent attitudes. Across experiments, it is demonstrated that increasing attitude certainty strengthens attitudes (e.g., increases their resistance to persuasion) when attitudes are univalent but weakens attitudes (e.g., decreases their resistance to persuasion) when attitudes are ambivalent. These results are consistent with the amplification hypothesis.


For the Orange article, the hypothesis is formally stated ..

AB - Purpose: In this article, the authors address the hypothesis that the severe and persistent speech disorder reported in persons with galactosemia meets contemporary diagnostic criteria for Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). A positive finding for CAS in this rare metabolic disorder has the potential to impact treatment of persons with galactosemia and inform explanatory perspectives on CAS in neurological, neurodevelopmental, and idiopathic contexts. Method: Thirty-three youth with galactosemia and significant prior or persistent speech sound disorder were assessed in their homes in 17 states. Participants completed a protocol yielding information on their cognitive, structural, sensorimotor, language, speech, prosody, and voice status and function. Results: Eight of the 33 participants (24%) met contemporary diagnostic criteria for CAS. Two participants, 1 of whom was among the 8 with CAS, met criteria for ataxic or hyperkinetic dysarthria. Groupwise findings for the remaining 24 participants are consistent with a classification category termed Motor Speech Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (Shriberg, Fourakis et al., 2010a). Conclusion: The authors estimate the prevalence of CAS in galactosemia at 18 per hundred-180 times the estimated risk for idiopathic CAS. Findings support the need to study risk factors for the high occurrence of motor speech disorders in galactosemia despite early compliant dietary management.

The answers to finding both the independent and dependent ..

The first journal article that I observed was "Sleep Patterns and Sleep Disruptions in School-Aged Children." This study assessed the sleep patterns, sleep disruptions, and sleepiness of school-age children.