NOVA - Official Website | A Conversation With E.O. Wilson

Mauss, I. B., Tamir, M., Anderson, C. L., & Savino, N. S. (2011). Can seeking happiness make people happy? Paradoxical effects of valuing happiness. . doi:10.1037/a0022010. Happiness is a key ingredient of well–being. It is thus reasonable to expect that valuing happiness will have beneficial outcomes. We argue that this may not always be the case. Instead, valuing happiness could be self–defeating, because the more people value happiness, the more likely they will feel disappointed. This should apply particularly in positive situations, in which people have every reason to be happy. Two studies support this hypothesis. In Study 1, female participants who valued happiness more (vs. less) reported lower happiness when under conditions of low, but not high, life stress. In Study 2, compared to a control group, female participants who were experimentally induced to value happiness reacted less positively to a happy, but not a sad, emotion induction. This effect was mediated by participants' disappointment at their own feelings. Paradoxically, therefore, valuing happiness may lead people to be less happy just when happiness is within reach.

08/01/2004 · In 1984, Edward Wilson published a slim volume called Biophilia

Hannah, S. T., Woolfolk, R. L., & Lord, R. G. (2009). Leader self–structure: A framework for positive leadership. , (2), 269–290. doi:10.1002/job.586. We expand the conceptualization of positive leadership and hypothesize that leaders' ability to influence followers across varied complex situations will be enhanced through the development of a rich and multifaceted self–construct. Utilizing self–complexity theory and other aspects of research on self–representation, we show how the structure and structural dynamics of leaders' self–constructs are linked to their varied role demands by calling forth cognitions, affects, goals and values, expectancies, and self–regulatory plans that enhance performance. Through this process, a leader is able to bring the "right stuff" (the appropriate ensemble of attributes) to bear on and succeed in the multiple challenges of leadership. We suggest future research to develop dimensional typologies related to leadership–relevant aspects of the self and also to link individual positive self–complexity to more aggregate positive organizational processes.


Biophilia in Practice: Buildings that Connect People …

Posted 04.01.08; NOVA; In 1984, Edward Wilson published a slim volume called Biophilia

In his book, Biophilia, Edward O. Wilson put forth the hypothesis that there is an instinctive bond between people and other living things. Building upon that idea, it’s logical that the natural environment can be a therapeutic place for healing and rehabilitation. Historically speaking, the use of gardens as places for healing and rejuvenation is nothing new.