TESTING THE DOUBLE BIND HYPOTHESIS: ..

This paper examines the faculty and scientists' recommendations of applicants to the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Fellowship Program, spanning the years from 1976 to 1991. The data are from the Cumulative Index on National Science Foundation Fellowships Applicants and Awardees (Cl). Ordinary Least Squares regression analysis of fellowship Reference Report scores is used to test the double bind hypothesh that minority women are doubly disadvantaged simply because they are both minorities and women. The findings generally support the double bind hypothesis: being a minority significantly lowered the Reference Report ratings of women NSF applicants and being a woman significantly lowered the Reference Report ratings of minority applicants. Support also was found for the identifiabilily construct of the double bind hypothesis that certain women who, by virtue of their appearance or language, are unmistakable as minorities and impact faculty recommendations in a manner distinct from nonidentifiable minority women. Compared to white women and minority men, being a Black, Puerto Rican, and other Hispanic woman significantly lowered faculty/scientists' recommendations. Implications for policy and further research directions are offered.

AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE DOUBLE BIND HYPOTHESIS 1

One of the causes of double binds is the loss of feedback systems. Gregory Bateson and Lawrence S. Bale describe double binds that have arisen in science that have caused decades-long delays of progress in science because science had defined something as outside of its scope (or "not ")--see Bateson in his to Steps to an Ecology of Mind (1972, 2000), pp. xv-xxvi; and Bale in his article, (esp. pp. 1–8) on the paradigm of classical science vs. that of systems theory/cybernetics. (See also Bateson's description in his of how the double bind hypothesis fell into place).


Paradox, Schizophrenia and the Double Bind Hypothesis…

(See also Bateson's description in his Forward of how the double bind hypothesis fell into place)

This paper examines the faculty and scientists' recommendations of applicants to the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Fellowship Program, spanning the years from 1976 to 1991. The data are from the Cumulative Index on National Science Foundation Fellowships Applicants and Awardees (Cl). Ordinary Least Squares regression analysis of fellowship Reference Report scores is used to test the double bind hypothesh that minority women are doubly disadvantaged simply because they are both minorities and women. The findings generally support the double bind hypothesis: being a minority significantly lowered the Reference Report ratings of women NSF applicants and being a woman significantly lowered the Reference Report ratings of minority applicants. Support also was found for the identifiabilily construct of the double bind hypothesis that certain women who, by virtue of their appearance or language, are unmistakable as minorities and impact faculty recommendations in a manner distinct from nonidentifiable minority women. Compared to white women and minority men, being a Black, Puerto Rican, and other Hispanic woman significantly lowered faculty/scientists' recommendations. Implications for policy and further research directions are offered.