Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

A series of N,N-3-phenyl-3-benzylaminopropanamide derivatives were identified as novel CETP (cholesteryl ester transfer protein) inhibitors. In our previous study, lead compound L10 was discovered by pharmacophore-based virtual screening (Dong-Mei Zhao et al., 2014). Based on L10 (IC50 8.06 μM), compound HL6 (IC50 10.7 μM) was discovered following systematic structure variation and biological tests. Further optimization of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) resulted in N,N-3-phenyl-3-benzylaminopro panamides derivatives as novel CETP inhibitors. They were synthesized and evaluated against CETP by BODIPY-CE fluorescence assay. Among them, HL16 (IC50 0.69 μM) was a highly potent CETP inhibitor in vitro. In addition, HL16 exhibited favorable HDL-C enhancement and LDL-C reduction in vivo by hamster. The molecular docking of HL16 into the CETP was performed. The binding mode demonstrated that HL16 occupied the CETP binding site and formed interactions with the key amino acid residues.

T1 - Host cell lipids control cholesteryl ester synthesis and storage in intracellular Toxoplasma

An examination of the effect of Plin2 on cellular metabolism revealed that triacylglycerol, fatty acid, and cholesteryl ester content increased while diacylglycerol remained constant in CFP-Plin2-overexpressing cells.


f Hepatitis C virus infection mediates cholesteryl ester synthesis …

Cholesteryl ester transfer protein:a novel target for raising HDL and inhibiting atherosclerosis.

Cholesteryl ester-rich particles extracted from human atherosclerotic plaques were shown to increase the rate of incorporation of [ 14C]oleate into cholesteryl [ 14C]oleate and to cause massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters in monolayers of mouse peritoneal macrophages. This stimulation showed saturation kinetics and susceptibility to competition by polyanions (polyinosinic acid, fucoidin, dextran sulfate), suggesting that cell surface binding was required. Cellular uptake and lysosomal hydrolysis of the cholesteryl esters were also required, as indicated by the finding that stimulation of cholesterol ester formation was prevented by the lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine. The cholesterol esterification-stimulating activity of the aortic extracts was excluded on a 2% agarose column and floated in the density range of 1.006 to 1.063 g/ml. Cholesterol-rich extracts from human adrenal glands and liver did not stimulate cholesteryl ester formation in macrophages, The aortic extracts did not stimulate cholesteryl ester synthesis in human fibroblasts. Complexes of 125I-labeled albumin and cholesteryl linoleate formed in vivo were taken up and degraded in macrophages but not in fibroblasts, by a process resembling the uptake of the aortic extracts. The current data suggest that macrophages express mechanisms for internalizing certain types of cholesteryl ester-rich lipid/protein complexes, including those present in atherosclerotic plaques.


Cholesterol and lipoproteins 101

N2 - Cholesteryl ester-rich particles extracted from human atherosclerotic plaques were shown to increase the rate of incorporation of [ 14C]oleate into cholesteryl [ 14C]oleate and to cause massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters in monolayers of mouse peritoneal macrophages. This stimulation showed saturation kinetics and susceptibility to competition by polyanions (polyinosinic acid, fucoidin, dextran sulfate), suggesting that cell surface binding was required. Cellular uptake and lysosomal hydrolysis of the cholesteryl esters were also required, as indicated by the finding that stimulation of cholesterol ester formation was prevented by the lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine. The cholesterol esterification-stimulating activity of the aortic extracts was excluded on a 2% agarose column and floated in the density range of 1.006 to 1.063 g/ml. Cholesterol-rich extracts from human adrenal glands and liver did not stimulate cholesteryl ester formation in macrophages, The aortic extracts did not stimulate cholesteryl ester synthesis in human fibroblasts. Complexes of 125I-labeled albumin and cholesteryl linoleate formed in vivo were taken up and degraded in macrophages but not in fibroblasts, by a process resembling the uptake of the aortic extracts. The current data suggest that macrophages express mechanisms for internalizing certain types of cholesteryl ester-rich lipid/protein complexes, including those present in atherosclerotic plaques.