hypothesis Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

In the figure above, I used the to calculate the probability of getting each possible number of males, from 0 to 48, under the null hypothesis that 0.5 are male. As you can see, the probability of getting 17 males out of 48 total chickens is about 0.015. That seems like a pretty small probability, doesn't it? However, that's the probability of getting exactly 17 males. What you want to know is the probability of getting 17 or fewer males. If you were going to accept 17 males as evidence that the sex ratio was biased, you would also have accepted 16, or 15, or 14,… males as evidence for a biased sex ratio. You therefore need to add together the probabilities of all these outcomes. The probability of getting 17 or fewer males out of 48, under the null hypothesis, is 0.030. That means that if you had an infinite number of chickens, half males and half females, and you took a bunch of random samples of 48 chickens, 3.0% of the samples would have 17 or fewer males.

"Language of Thought Hypothesis | Internet …

: In everyday language, an error is simply a mistake, but in science, error has a precise statistical meaning. An error is the difference between a measurement and the true value, often resulting from taking a . For example, imagine that you want to know if corn plants produce more massive ears when grown with a new fertilizer, and so you weigh ears of corn from those plants. You take the mass of your sample of 50 ears of corn and calculate an average. That average is a good estimate of what you are really interested in: the average mass of ears of corn that could be grown with this fertilizer. Your estimate is not a mistake — but it does have an error (in the statistical sense of the word) since your estimate is not the true value. Sampling error of the sort described above is inherent whenever a smaller sample is taken to represent a larger entity. Another sort of error results from systematic biases in measurement (e.g., if your scale were calibrated improperly, all of your measurements would be off). Systematic error biases measurements in a particular direction and can be more difficult to quantify than sampling error.


The Language of Thought Hypothesis

Hypothesis testing applications with a dichotomous outcome variable in a single population are also performed according to the five-step procedure. Similar to tests for means, a key component is setting up the null and research hypotheses. The objective is to compare the proportion of successes in a single population to a known proportion (p0). That known proportion is generally derived from another study or report and is sometimes called a historical control. It is important in setting up the hypotheses in a one sample test that the proportion specified in the null hypothesis is a fair and reasonable comparator.


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Now instead of testing 1000 plant extracts, imagine that you are testing just one. If you are testing it to see if it kills beetle larvae, you know (based on everything you know about plant and beetle biology) there's a pretty good chance it will work, so you can be pretty sure that a P value less than 0.05 is a true positive. But if you are testing that one plant extract to see if it grows hair, which you know is very unlikely (based on everything you know about plants and hair), a P value less than 0.05 is almost certainly a false positive. In other words, if you expect that the null hypothesis is probably true, a statistically significant result is probably a false positive. This is sad; the most exciting, amazing, unexpected results in your experiments are probably just your data trying to make you jump to ridiculous conclusions. You should require a much lower P value to reject a null hypothesis that you think is probably true.

Do you think, as Gary Paul Nabhan and Sara St

: In everyday language, a is a rule that must be abided or something that can be relied upon to occur in a particular situation. Scientific laws, on the other hand, are less rigid. They may have exceptions, and, like other scientific knowledge, may be modified or rejected based on new evidence and perspectives. In science, the term usually refers to a generalization about and is a compact way of describing what we'd expect to happen in a particular situation. Some laws are non-mechanistic statements about the relationship among observable phenomena. For example, the ideal gas law describes how the pressure, volume, and temperature of a particular amount of gas are related to one another. It does not describe how gases behave; we know that gases do not precisely conform to the ideal gas law. Other laws deal with phenomena that are not directly observable. For example, the second law of thermodynamics deals with entropy, which is not directly observable in the same way that volume and pressure are. Still other laws offer more mechanistic explanations of phenomena. For example, Mendel's first law offers a of how genes are distributed to gametes and offspring that helps us make about the outcomes of genetic crosses. The term may be used to describe many different forms of scientific knowledge, and whether or not a particular idea is called a law has much to do with its discipline and the time period in which it was first developed.