One Piece: The Seven Warlords of the Sea / Characters …

Meanwhile, in 1624, the Dutch established a North American colony of their own in a region they had claimed 15 years earlier. In 1607-08, Henry Hudson, an Englishman, had sailed twice for his nation's Muscovy Company, searching for the northern passage to Asia via the Arctic Ocean. A year later, while Port-Royal lay abandoned and the Englishmen at Jamestown struggled to maintain their infant colony, Hudson led a third expedition in search of the elusive passage, this one for the Dutch East India Company, founded in 1602. In a single ship, the , Hudson left Amsterdam in early April 1609 and sailed up the coast of Norway, back towards the Arctic Ocean. Having gone that way twice with no success and running into heavy sea ice again, he turned westward at Norway's North Cape and crossed the northern ocean to the Grand Bank of Newfoundland. He did not make landfall until July, when he lingered for 10 days at La Hève, in French La Cadie, to repair a broken mast and to fish for food. He and his Dutchmen encountered Mi'kmaq willing to trade their furs, but commerce evidently did not take place. On July 25, a dozen sailors, brandishing muskets and small cannon, attacked the nearest village, drove off the natives, and took their boats and whatever else they pleased. Rounding Cap-Sable, Hudson led his Dutchmen southwest to the coast of Maine and reached Cape Cod on August 4. He continued on to the entrance of Chesapeake Bay before sailing north to Delaware Bay, which he discovered and explored. On September 3, he re-discovered today's New York harbor, where Verrazzano had lingered in 1524. Five days later, the expedition lost an Englishman to an Indian arrow fired from the shore. On September 11, Hudson reached upper New York harbor. For 10 days, he sailed up the river he called Mauritius, but which now bears his name, as far as his ship could take him. Only then was he certain that this body of water was not the northern passage to Asia. After trading for furs with several tribes along the river, he re-crossed the North Atlantic, arriving at Dartmouth, England, on November 7. He managed to pass his ship's log to the Dutch ambassador in London, and the Netherlands now had a claim of their own to territory in North America. A fourth voyage, in 1610, this time under the aegis of the Virginia and British East India companies, led to Hudson's discovery on August 3 of the great northern bay which still bears his name and to his death in the bay at the hands of mutineers in the summer of 1611. Meanwhile, the Dutch pondered settling in territory also claimed by England, Spain, and France. Managing to avoid the English and the French, several Dutch trading expeditions visited the Manhattan area in the five years following Hudson's exploration. In November 1613, however, English admiral Samuel Argall, on his way back to Virginia after burning Port-Royal, forced a small contingent of Dutchmen at the Manhattan post to acknowledge English rule in the region. The name New Netherland appeared on the map of a 1614 expedition led by Portuguese-Dominican trader Juan Rodriguez, of African descent, who was known to the Dutch as Jan Rodrigues. By then, Dutch claims in the region, centering on Manhattan, ran north to Cape Cod and south to Chesapeake Bay. In 1614, Dutch merchants established a fur-trading post, Fort Nassau, on Hudson's Mauritius, near the place where he had ended his upriver exploration, at present-day Albany. By doing so, "the Dutch strove to channel the fur trade" from the French-controlled St. Lawrence valley "toward the Hudson River." In 1621, a year after the English ship failed to reach its original destination on Hudson's river, the Dutch created their own West India Company and ordered the private traders in the region to vacate their posts. Not until 1624, however, did the Company sanction settlements in New Netherland colony: on Nut Island, today's Governor's Island in New York harbor; at New Amsterdam, on the tip of Manhattan; at Fort Nassau, which they renamed Fort Orange; on the Delaware River west of Manhattan; and at the mouth of Verse River, now the Connecticut, north of New Amsterdam. New Netherland now stood poised between Virginia and Plymouth and promised to complicate further imperial rivalries in North America.

docked at Marco Island Yachting on Marco’s Waters 80 years of combined boat-building experience

It was an obscure Italian with a bold idea who brought Iberian exploitation of the Atlantic world to an entirely new level. Cristoforo Colombo was born in Genoa in 1451, the son of a weaver who lost his boy to the lure of the sea. Young Columbus, as we know him, worked in the merchant fleet of his native city and then switched his allegiance to Portugal. Inspired by fellow Italian Marco Polo, sometime in the late 1480s, after carefully (mis)calculating the circumference of the earth, Columbus conceived his great plan—to reach the Indies by sailing westward across the Atlantic Ocean. He was confident his skills at navigation and command could overcome all obstacles he surely would encounter, but the result would be worth it: Portugal would then control a much shorter route to the spices, and souls, of Asia. Columbus presented his idea to his Portuguese masters, but a maritime commission rejected his calculations and refused to entrust a fleet to him. Undaunted, he moved on to France, England, and Spain but met similar rejection. Refusing to give up on his grand idea, he eventually sold his plan to Queen Isabella of Castile, who, with her husband, King Ferdinand of Aragon, had just conquered the Moors and established a degree of domestic tranquility within their Iberian kingdoms. Christian Spain was ready, Isabella believed, to compete in the Eastern trade and to bring the Asians to Christianity. So Columbus became the admiral of a fleet of three ships which, in the late summer of 1492, sailed from Palos to the Canary Islands. Two months later, after sailing due west across the Atlantic, Columbus's flotilla reached what he insisted were islands of "the Indies," and the history of the world was profoundly changed. Though Columbus himself never fully acknowledged that he had stumbled upon a "new world," others did. As early as 1503, three years before Columbus's death, Amerigo Vespucci, a Florentine then working for Portugal, applied the term --New World--to what is now the coast of Brazil. Three decades later, Gerardus Mercator, in his map of the world, applied the poetic name "America" to the entirety of the . Meanwhile, Iberian , beginning in the 1510s, exploited Columbus’s discoveries and brought wealth and power to Spain.


designboom magazine | your first source for …

Boating is popular on and around Marco Island. The Marco Island – Naples Southwest Florida region is a boaters paradise with easy access to the Gulf of Mexico and the amazing 10,000 Islands Region. Bring your boat or rent a boat from a Marco – Naples Marina. There are several Marco Island, Naples and Port of the Islands marinas and boat rentals available. Enjoy a boat tour, rent a boat for the half day or whole day. Find marinas, boat and yacht sales, boat rentals, and water sports dealers both on the island and in Goodland, Isles of Capri and nearby Naples. Renting a pontoon boat, motor boat, sailboat or catamaran and exploring the the nearby 10,000 islands region of the Florida Everglades, is a wonderful way to see the area and view wildlife. The entire Gulf of Mexico is waiting. Share your Marco Island – Naples FL reviews or ask us about visiting Marco Island Florida. To feature your business, .